Amy Lindsey | GC News-Gazette City, county and state employees join Leitchfield Mayor Rick Embry, far right, and Judge/Executive Kevin Henderson, to his left, at the James D. Beville Community Park on Tuesday to help clean up road waste that entered the creek.

Amy Lindsey | GC News-Gazette

City, county and state employees join Leitchfield Mayor Rick Embry, far right, and Judge/Executive Kevin Henderson, to his left, at the James D. Beville Community Park on Tuesday to help clean up road waste that entered the creek.

A sludge spill resulted in the temporary closure of James D. Beville Community Park for cleanup earlier this week.

According to Leitchfield Parks and Recreation Director Tammee Saltsman, a runner noticed sludge in the creek that leads to the city lake in Beville Park and alerted Beville Park Maintenance Supervisor Keith Pierce. Pierce then built a barrier to attempt to keep the sludge from going further downstream.

After Saltsman and other officials were called, the Kentucky Department of Transportation, Leitchfield Utilities and the Leitchfield Fire Department responded and placed sponges across the creek to help soak up more of the sludge.

According to Grayson County Emergency Management Director Tony Willen, there is an illegal dumping site at the 108 mile marker of the Western Kentucky Parkway where construction and road work companies tend to dump dirt, gravel and road waste into a hole.

City officials have not yet determined who dumped the sludge - believed to be road waste or driveway sealant - that washed down into the creek from the hole at the 108 mile marker. The matter is being investigated by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and the Environmental Protection Agency.

"Hopefully it doesn't go any further," said Leitchfield Mayor Rick Embry, who later stated that Leitchfield Utilities and the Leitchfield Fire Department had also built a dam on the side of the William Thomason Byway to attempt to keep more waste from entering the creek.

Saltsman said that they were able to contain the leakage by making a temporary pond.

The Department of Fish & Wildlife and the EPA were called to check on the condition of the water for people, plants and animals, and, according to Saltsman, the EPA was pleased with the promptness of Leitchfield's cleanup and prevention efforts and told city officials they may have prevented a bigger problem.

The park was closed while the cleanup process took place Tuesday afternoon but was re-opened Wednesday.