Amy Lindsey | GC News-Gazette U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie speaks to Caneyville Elementary School fifth grade students Wednesday about the history and duties of the U.S. government.

Amy Lindsey | GC News-Gazette

U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie speaks to Caneyville Elementary School fifth grade students Wednesday about the history and duties of the U.S. government.

Fifth graders at Caneyville Elementary School received a visit from the Republican U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie (KY-02) Wednesday morning.

The visit was supposed to have taken place previously, but school was out for a snow day, so the congressman returned Wednesday to give the students a history lesson, as well as a lesson on politics.

Guthrie described the government in Great Britain before going on to discuss the reasons people moved from England to the United States. He also explained the differences between the two governments.

He then discussed how the people who settled in the United States were able to start their own government and why they wanted to.

After the discussion about the first settlers of the United States, Guthrie went on to explain the branches of government and why the forefathers felt it necessary to make it so difficult to make laws. He said that, if making laws were easier and did not have to go through all of the checks and balances currently required, it would make it easy for one person to gain too much power.

Guthrie explained to students that in order for our government to work the way that our forefathers intended, there needs to be people who make laws, people to enforce the laws, and people to judge.

He told the students that his job is to help make laws, and he explained the process bills have to go through before they are able to be made into a law.

Guthrie told the students that Congress is made of both the House of Representatives and the Senate, and a bill has to be approved by both of them before it ever gets to the President. He also told them that even if the President does not pass a bill, it can be sent back to Congress, and, if even more people agree on making it a bill, they can bypass the President.

He concluded his presentation by telling students that, when they are old enough, they need to exercise their right to vote, no matter which political party they choose.

The students answered questions and posed questions for Guthrie to answer, and, afterward, they had pictures taken with Guthrie.