Who was David Leitch?


Part two in a series

By Curtis Dewees



After the Revolutionary War, David settled back into his normal routine. The war was so expensive that the Virginia Treasury was broke. So it sold treasury warrants for vacant land in Kentucky to raise money. Between 1781 and 1783, David bought a total of 57 warrants, for a total of £575,123. That was $1,502,246 in dollars.

It is a mystery where all of that money came from. He acquired a total of 358,828 acres all over Kentucky. In Grayson County, he owned about 31,300 acres, on Little Clifty Creek, Nolin, Short Creek, and Rough River. To get an idea of the size of so many acres, one square mile is equal to 640 acres. Thus, 13,700 acres, from part of which Leitchfield was formed, would cover an area of 21.41 square miles! The total number of 358,828 acres David bought is equivalent to 560.67 square miles. That is about half the size of Rhode Island! It is not known whether he ever came to Grayson County.

David first arrived in Kentucky in 1782, but commuted back and forth between Kentucky and Virginia for several years. He was active in several community organizations. He settled on a farm near Lexington. That’s where he met Keturah Moss, who lived on the adjoining farm. They married in December of 1790, when Keturah was 17 and David was already 35. Undoubtedly, Keturah was happy to escape her family situation. That is because there were three families living together, and there were 15 children seated at the dining room table.

Your comments and questions are welcome. You may email me at alitu154@gmail.com.

Part two in a series

By Curtis Dewees

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