Amy Lindsey | GC News-GazetteGoldie was released on Sunday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m. at the farm of Christopher Smith.

Amy Lindsey | GC News-Gazette

Goldie was released on Sunday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m. at the farm of Christopher Smith.

An injured Golden Eagle, found in Caneyville in August, was released back into the wild this past weekend.

On Aug. 14, 2017, Christopher Smith found an injured Golden Eagle in the road near his farm. Broadbent Wildlife Sanctuary came to Smith's farm to retrieve the animal.

Broadbent's mission is to rescue sick, injured and orphaned wildlife throughout the state. They have people on staff everyday of the year, including holidays to provide care to wildlife in need. Their goal is to rehabilitate these animals and release them back into their native environment.

According to Mary Ann Tobin, founder of Broadbent Wildlife Sanctuary, the eagle, who was named Goldie by Broadbent staff, was transported to their clinic in Irvington, KY for examination and treatment by Dr. Mike O'Bryan.

Smith said when he found the bird, it was limping on one leg and only able to fly short distances.

A press release stated that Goldie was given an x-ray on her leg and it confirmed that her femur was fractured. Dr. O'Bryan performed surgery on the leg, "placing two external pins and an acrylic fixture on the bird's leg."

According to the press release, the eagle was able to move into a flight cage in order to build her strength back up after weeks of rehabilitation and supportive care.

According to National Geographic, the Golden Eagle "is North America's largest bird of prey and the national bird of Mexico. These birds are dark brown, with lighter golden-brown plumage on their heads and necks. They are extremely swift, and can dive upon their quarry at speeds of more than 150 miles per hour."

According to Broadbent's press release, Golden Eagles are about the same size as a Bald Eagle, but Golden Eagles are more predatory than scavengers.

Goldie was released on Sunday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m. at the farm of Christopher Smith. If you happen to see Goldie, give the Broadebnt Wildlife Sanctuary a call to let them know how she's doing.

Mary Ann Tobin said, "Our goal is always to return a rescued bird to the same area in case there is a mate nearby, and since eagles can mate for life, we hope that they will eventually reproduce and bring many more eagles into the Kentucky skies."

According to National Geographic, "Golden eagle pairs maintain territories that may be as large as 60 square miles. Golden eagles nest in high places including cliffs, trees, or human structures such as telephone poles.

They build huge nests to which they may return for several breeding years. Females lay from one to four eggs, and both parents incubate them for 40 to 45 days. Typically, one or two young survive to fledge in about three months."

According to the press release, Broadbent Wildlife Sanctuary employs full-time on-site staff, including a veterinarian and licensed wildlife rehabilitators. In addition to providing medical treatment and loving supportive care to thousands of animals every year, they educate children and adults to co-exist with wildlife and to respect all animals.

Since Broadbent Wildlife Sanctuary is a 501(c)3 nonprofit Organization, they rely on donations to continue this work. For help or information on injured wildlife, or to make a tax-deductible donation, contact (270) 547-4200 or visit www.broadbentwildlife.org.

Amy Lindsey | GC News-Gazette

Goldie was released on Sunday, Oct. 29 at 1:00 p.m. at the farm of Christopher Smith.

Amy Lindsey | GC News-Gazette

If you happen to see Goldie, give the Broadent Wildlife Sanctuary a call to let them know how she's doing at (270) 547-4200.